Collins it a day

Celtic assistant head coach, John Collins confirmed his departure from the club on Monday. He will follow Ronny Deila after the league is wrapped up this weekend.

Deila appointed Collins as his assistant eleven days after he arrived at the club himself. Ronny has always maintained that the ex-Celtic player was his choice, but elsewhere within the Celtic community it has been stated that he got to choose from a list of candidates collated by the club.

Personally, I don’t think that is too much of an issue given that this has happened in the past at the club. He may have wanted to bring in his own back room team but given their was an element of risk in appointing Deila, the club were most likely protecting their investment by bringing in a “Celtic man” to keep in on track.

I’m not saying that this was the perfect blend but at the time this is how I saw the move. It isn’t as though Ronny knew Collins before then.

When Wim Jansen came to Celtic in 1997, Murdo Macleod was appointed assistant coach. I’m sure neither of those knew each other and a similar situation occurred back then just like it did in 2014.

In terms of a working relationship, I have absolutely no idea of the dynamics of the outgoing Celtic coaching team. Collins leaving will not be a disappointment to anyone particularly as his role was virtually anonymous.

You rarely saw a peep out of the ex-Celt which is surprising given his previous managerial experience and distinguishable playing carer. In fact I would probably say that John Kennedy was more prominent on match days.

With two-thirds of the coaching team now set to depart, a question mark remains over Kennedy. Unless he has other options, Celtic may retain his services elsewhere within the club’s structure.

After a long road to recovery in his playing career, Kennedy finally retired at the age of 26. His playing days were ruined five years earlier in his only international appearance for Scotland.

Despite long spells on the side lines and numerous operations he was never the same player when he did return for a very short period. Kennedy eventually returned to Celtic as a scout and later became involved in coaching.

Having being promoted to first team coach under Deila, just as the Norwegian had himself at Strømsgodset, Kennedy completed the coaching trio. Celtic have been very supportive to Kennedy and they may continue that, but I don’t see the 32 year old being part of a new coaching set up.

If kept on he will no doubt take a step back into scouting or coaching younger players. I have no doubts that he can still provide a service to the club.

So with the coaching landscape getting a white wash, we can expect a fresh approach. None of us would argue that, that is what we are all hoping for.

A new manager will most likely want to bring in his own staff. With that in mind, I think Celtic will be aiming to appoint someone with club knowledge and better experience.

Not necessarily an ex-player as such, but someone who knows what Celtic is all about. Perhaps a man with Celtic in his heart or knows what to expect from a big club.

Celtic must aim high this time. Not because of domestic matters, but because expectations are so great regardless of competition.

As I said in my last blog, Europe is so important for this club financially. The fans need the Champions League just as much as the accounts do as well.

Celtic can win the title even when they are not at their best such is the gulf in finance. The club must go beyond that though and get back into the group stages of the Champions League.

For that to happen you can forget 99% of the rumours. If Celtic have read the script correctly, we should not be disappointed by the next manager.

Hail! Hail!

Stevie Mac

Everything out in the open

At a time in the season when trophies are the paramount of importance, another discussion is in circulation on planet Celtic. Discontent is high on the agenda right now and the future of this Celtic team, their coaching staff and those who wear the suits, surrounds everything.

If you consider Celtic to be the best team in Scotland, which they still are at the moment, an outsider might say “well what’s the problem then?” The simple answer would be “for how much longer?”

That of course is based partly on the current sequence of events which is largely seeing Celtic struggle to secure a fifth successive league title. It doesn’t end there though because the situation is bigger than that.

What’s bigger than the league? The Champions League of course.

One does not exist without the other though. To get to the latter you must first win the former.

Having missed out last season, but having a relatively decent innings in the Europa League, we all expected more in the current campaign. What happened turned out to be worse though.

It’s hard to ignore the regression of this season. Celtic’s faltering attempt to remain a European force has taken us down a peg or two.

Nobody likes it and it has hit the supporters hard. In truth we threw away a superb opportunity to make it this season and ultimately failed the European test.

By comparison we failed even more in this season’s Europa League campaign than the last. Statistically, there isn’t much between this season and the last in the Scottish Premiership and at the same stage.

Yet this time last year this squad were finding their feet. They were looking sharper than what we had seen earlier in the campaign and there was a sign that things were coming together.

Where did it all go wrong then? Was it Champions League failure that crucified our season or was it something else?

Are Ronny Deila’s efforts exhausted or is something amiss? It’s hard to define exactly what the problem is when you have players coming out to back the manager and taking the blame themselves.

Then Ronny calls it as he sees fit. The “players didn’t do well enough” or “we’re improving all the time”.

At times I feel he is just telling the media whatever he needs to protect himself and his players. You can’t ignore a really dire performance but he has done so on occasion.

Ronny is a highly intelligent and likeable man. I get the distinct feeling we don’t see the real Ronny enough.

As for the current set of problems, I don’t know where the issue lies precisely. The only thing I can say is that we’re not seeing a good product on the park for this club or its fans.

Is it the coaches or is it the players? Are the players not receiving the right motivation and tactics or are the players simply not good enough or influential enough to lead this club?

On their game, I would say all of the current Celtic squad are capable of remaining Celtic players with one or two exceptions. So why aren’t they performing individually or as a team?

What do the men upstairs think about all of this? Are they already looking at alternatives or are they sticking by ‘their’ man?

I’m not sure that the addition of more players is the answer either. It’s about how we are playing on the day.

I’d happily take a couple more players to ensure that next season we have the correct quantity and quality for each position. That would also mean moving some deadwood out, but I think there is more at play here.

I think there are some players in this team that really want to play for this coaching team and some that don’t. This is where I think the problem might be and if I am being honest something or someone will have to give.

If I am right about this then there is a stalemate within the club. Even if you have most players playing for the head coach, there will be an atmosphere which upsets the harmony.

You know what though, I could be completely wrong but I think there is something in that. And perhaps this is where these “clear the air” talks have stemmed from.

This time last year we were on the up and now we’re not. If it is simply that Ronny Deila is out of his depth then we’ll soon know.

If there is more to it and Celtic have been trying to contain the matter then I’m sure it’ll all come out in the wash eventually. The club do not appear to be pushing Ronny out the door and whilst that may suggest they are not taking action, perhaps we as supporters don’t have all of the facts.

Only the players and coaching staff know what the problem is. It’s up to them to sort it out if they are to win this double.

Hail! Hail!

Stevie Mac

 

 

Best of the best

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After reading Ramon Vega’s recent comments on his regret about leaving Celtic, albeit fifteen years ago, it got me thinking about former Celtic players in a similar position. When it comes to leaving Celtic prematurely, he is not alone, even if some players have failed to acknowledge it.

Vega is but one example of a player drafted in in the short term with little expected of him. Yet he turned out to be an influential player during a very brief period under Martin O’Neill.

Apparently Celtic had tried to procure his services prior to that season but Vega turned down the opportunity. He later accepted a loan move midway through season 2000-2001.

In 26 appearances he scored 4 goals for the club and picked up a treble into the bargain. This still wasn’t enough to convince him to stay on though.

Instead he followed the money and went to Gianluca Vialli’s Watford, opting for cash over trophies. That move lasted one season and eventually he was shipped out.

He found himself playing for Ligue 2 French side Créteil, where he would end his career at the age of 33. Fairly early by even by standards back then.

In some ways, getting a large payday in his second last season wasn’t such a bad move financially. The fact that he regrets leaving Celtic though suggests what many fans though at the time.

He could have had another shot at glory the following year and maybe even retired with Celtic. The decision he eventually made he regrets, but he isn’t the first ex-Celtic player to do this.

For other former Celts it’s been a mixed bag of success. Many have come through the ranks and at the first sign of progress, headed for so called greener pastures.

Historically, Celtic have been criticised for not stumping up the cash. When you go back to the era when the club was run by the Kelly’s and co, that isn’t much of a surprise.

Having said that, the way business was conducted back then, I wouldn’t know who to believe. I mean in those days you had the Kelly, White, Grant, McGinn and Farrell stronghold in one corner and in the other you had jokers like Charlie Nicholas or Frank McAvennie.

In the era of change for Celtic, i.e. Fergus McCann onwards, club business was moving into new territory. McCann was a tough and shrewd businessman who generally did it his way or not at all but he had a plan.

He encountered the infamous “three amigos” during that period and stood for none of their nonsense. Whilst the fans were in their debt to Fergus for saving the club, they idolised Pierre van Hooijdonk, Jorge Cadete and Paulo Di Canio at the same time.

This was a forward line to get your juices flowing if every there was one. They all left within months of one another with money at the heart of most of it.

They each had different experiences following those moves. Van Hooijdonk (money demands) moved to Nottingham Forrest in March of his final season and ended up getting relegated but he experienced an upwards turn in his career with a moves to Vitesse, Benfica, Feyenoord, Fenerbahçe, NAC Breda and back to Feyenoord once again.

Di Canio (also money demands) went to Sheffield Wednesday in a swap deal with Regi Blinker coming in the opposite direction. Di Canio carved out a relatively successful career following that move to England, moving onward to West Ham and Charlton Athletic before winding up his playing days back home in Italy with Lazio, his first club, and then minnows Cisco Roma.

As for Cadete, well his so called ‘mental state’ didn’t really wash with many Celtic fans. Devastated as we were, it was clear that he wanted to move, whether that motive was money or adjusting to life in Scotland.

For a free transfer, he certainly gave Celtic a shot in the arm with his goal return even if it resulted in no trophies. I don’t even think Jorge would argue that Celtic was a career peak for him.

Had he or any of the other ‘amigos’ stayed on for the season that followed, who knows what devastation they would have unleashed. Perhaps if they had we may never have seen Henrik Larsson in the Hoops.

Whilst each of those players left on bad terms they had their own post-Celtic story to tell. They netted Celtic on average about £4m each in transfer fees which 20 years ago was pretty good money for the club.

Let’s not forget about the goal tally these players amassed in a short space of time. Van Hooijdink – 52 goals in 96 appearances; Di Canio – 15 goals in 37 appearances; Cadete – 33 goals in 44 appearances.

Cadete easily had the worst career path following his Celtic exit, whilst Di Canio and Van Hooijdonk had positive experiences right up until the end of their playing days.

These guys were markers for the future. Lessons learned, money earned.

Celtic would still fumble matters with players though. Though let’s face it, footballers aren’t the easiest of ‘personalities’ to deal with in business.

Another player who left Celtic that summer was none other than current assistant coach at the club, John Collins. He became Celtic’s first Bosman departure in 1996.

That took him to AS Monaco, a European force at the time. After two years there, he moved on to Everton and later, Fulham.

To be fair to Collins, he was a fantastic player at Celtic and had earned his free transfer. After six gruelling years at a the club, mostly bad years, he deserved more from his career.

In the years that followed, Mark Viduka would become the another player to make a name for himself at Celtic only to exit when he had had enough. His arrival was surrounded with controversy following a messy departure form Croatia Zagreb and a move that had looked to have collapsed.

Still, he made a valuable contribution in a season and a half at the club. He scored 27 goals in 37 appearances at Celtic but before too long he would be plying his trade with money laden Leeds United.

Once more, Celtic had lost a marvellous player to a higher paying employer. In the midst of all this, a new era was taking shape with higher valued players filling the ranks at Celtic Park.

New management began to reshape what was already in place. There would also be key additions to the team as Celtic went from manager to manager over a short time.

The club needed stability and they had one player whose loyality, relationship and professionalism will never ever be questioned. If ever there was a model professional it was Henrik Larsson.

Either side of his 7 years at the club, as well as during, there were players coming and going which have never equalled what he did. A few have come close, but it just goes to show it is more than ability that makes a player special.

You must have that rapport with the fans. The style of play that wins you praise from around the globe and earns you the kind love you can only get from a particular kind of club and fan base.

When guys like Simon Donnelly, Mark Burchill and Liam Miller were playing with Larsson, they were looking for more money as well. Larsson was rewarded more than any other Celt in history.

The difference is that he had earned it through more than just one good goal, one good match or one good season. He did it across the board like a true professional which is something of a rareity in the modern day.

Of those players who have come and gone at Celtic, undervalued what they were part of at the time and later moved on to bleaker times, take note. The grass is not always greener.

Now James Forrest looks set to go the way players such as Shaun Maloney and Stylian Petrov did. The deal offered to him has been rejected and now he is prepared to join the list of players who probably have it made at Celtic but see bright lights in the distance.

To be the best of the best you must evaluate what you have before you consider what’s on offer and where that might lead. If your desire lies elsewhere get good advice or you too might be sharing the regret that Ramon Vega has come to know.

Hail! Hail!

Stevie Mac

Celtic v Inverness Caledonian Thistle

When it comes to giant killing, Caley Thistle have done their fair share. Unfortunately for us Celtic fans, we’ve been on the end of these killings in three cup competitions.

John Barnes was the first Celtic manager to suffer at the hands of Inverness in the Scottish Cup 16 years ago. That was later followed up in 2003 under Martin O’Neill’s tenure in the same competition.

On both of those occasions, Inverness were a First Division club (now the Scottish Championship). In the years that followed, Inverness showed that they were a team worth paying attention to having made the SPL (now Scottish Premiership) in 2004.

They certainly weren’t one season wonders either. After five seasons in the top flight, they were relegated but only for one season.

in 2010 they were back in the top flight and have remained there ever since. Last season they inflicted more pain on Celtic when they dumped the Hoops out of the Scottish Cup for the third time.

They went on to win the cup last year and also made their debut in Europe, exiting the Europa League in the second qualifying round. So far this season they’ve failed to duplicate last seasons form.

However, despite things being slow moving this season, they have still managed to keep Aberdeen at bay for almost a year. The Dons haven’t beaten them this season at all and credit to John Hughes, he has managed to haul his team up the league and into the top half.

In fact, Caley Thistle are only 1 point off 4th spot in the Scottish Premiership. They also have two games at hand over the current 4th placed club, Ross County.

So today will be no easy ride for Celtic I’m sure. There have been a handful of additions to the Ronny Deila’s team recently, some back from injury and some who have rarely featured at all.

Celtic supporters are talking about seeing more of Scott Allan, Ryan Christie and of course loanee Patrick Roberts. John Collins hinted that we may see the latter of the three today, but we’ve yet to see Allan and Christie in as regulars.

Their futures are long-term at the club and it is likely that because of that, they are not been thrown into the team just yet. It seems that with the growing number of midfielders at the club though, we’ll have to shed some of our load.

That is a no brainer of course. You don’t need a crystal ball, the media or John Collins to tell you that.

What fans are also talking about is “who is for the exit door?” At this stage you can only speculate.

Almost every Celtic midfielder right now, has a valid reason for wanting to go or for the club moving them on. It’s a lottery to be quite honest and its anyone’s guess who is for the chop.

After a dire season for him so far, Stefan Johansen is top of some lists. Come the summer he will have been at the club for two-and-a-half seasons and with only one of those seasons being poor (the current one), it would seem rather harsh to sell him based upon that.

Nir Bitton, one of Celtic’s best players has a long-term deal (not that, that stands for anything at Celtic) but he is probably our most profitable midfielder right now. For that reason, it would not surprise me if Celtic tried to cash in on that this summer.

Recently back from long-term injury is Charlie Mulgrew. Now I am a fan of Charlie, but because his deal is due to run out, questions have been raised over his future but with his versatility, relatively low salary and an influential Scottish player, I doubt Celtic would let him go.

Tom Rogić, a player I never thought would wear the Hoops ever again, has been a revelation this season. Even though Europe was a major let down for the club and the domestic scene has been a real slog, Tom has been a stand out performer for me and his Celtic future should be a priority.

Kris Commons has ben on the sidelines recently with injury and illness. He has weighed in with 9 goals overall this season but at the age of 32 and not always a first pick for Ronny Deila, he could be moved on.

It would be a great shame to part with such a gifted player. Last season he was well out of the picture at one point but he still massed 16 goals in all competitions.

I think his experience is undervalued at times, especially for big games. Personally, I would be looking to retain his services as one of the club’s most experienced players but with inflated numbers at the club, he could be on wrong end of the decision making.

Out on the wide areas there are a few players vying for similar positions. James Forrest, Callum McGregor and Gary Mackay-Steven have all seen action this season but Celtic cannot possibly sustain all three, particularly when they have just drafted in Patrick Roberts on loan until the end of next season.

When on his game, Forrest is a nightmare for defenders. He can add goals as much as an assist but he is often let down by injury.

McGregor got his chance under Ronny Deila last season and repaid him immediately with a goal on his debut in Europe. As that season wore on, he faded out of the picture and after getting injured has made it back into the fold this season.

He appears to be one of Ronny Deila’s favourites. In fairness to McGregor, he has made a fair contribution recently as well.

Mackay-Steven has also been out of the picture but he came back onto the scene recently as well. He too has goals in him and plays in a wide area but can support the front man as well.

In this area though, something has to give. And there are other players possibly looking at summer exits.

Efe Ambrose is far from having a CSC named after him (or does he have one already)t. With the defence already beginning to take shape without him, he could be on his way out.

Tyler Blackett is most likely going to return to Manchester United. He hasn’t impressed at all, though to be fair I think he was out of his depth to begin with.

Stefan Šćepović, currently out on loan at Getafe, may not even return to Celtic. Having signed on deadline day two summers ago, he has failed to hit the heights in Scotland.

I thought he had a good chance this season to prove himself but was sent out on loan instead. Whether that was his desire or Deila’s desire, I can’t see Celtic bringing him back again.

Also out on loan is Anthony Stokes. Despite what any fan thinks of his playing ability, good or bad, it would appear it is his off the field issues that are the problem.

There is not doubt that the player has talent but his time is almost certainly up. I am fairly certain Celtic will move him on this summer.

A question mark remains over Nadir Çiftçi though. He got the nod in Europe early on in the season mainly because he had a domestic ban and couldn’t play in the league.

In half a season he hasn’t looked anywhere near doing a job. Will he come back?

I think he probably will. Whether he ever makes it at Celtic though remains in doubt.

Last but not least is Derk Boerrigter. And that’s all I have to say about him.

Good luck to the Hoops today, whoever manages to get a game! Time to open up that lead at the of the Scottish Premiership.

Hail! Hail!

Stevie Mac

EK OK but revenge is on the cards

If there is one area of the current Celtic team that has been of concern to me, it is motivation. That isn’t to say there aren’t other topics worth debating, but in my opinion this has been one subject that has had question mark over it this season.

Ronny Deila has been intent on improving physical capability, diet, lifetstyle etc. It has been apparent in some games though that matchday motivation is missing.

Sometime it’s the individual, sometimes the whole team. Even if you’re not the Ferguson haridryer type of head coach, perhaps you need a drill sergeant in your coaching staff.

I don’t know if that type of person exists at Celtic these days. I don’t know if it goes against Ronny’s philosophy, but in Scotland or even the UK, I’d say you need someone like that on your staff.

I wouldn’t say that you necessarily need that person to bark at you in each game but sometimes you need to be inspired and motivated by saying the right thing at the right time. That can come from within the individual, but I would almost certainly say that you need someone in ‘authority’ to do that one-to-one or to the whole team.

Maybe Ronny is the guy that plays that role, but then again maybe he isn’t the right kind of guy to utter those words. Does he need someone on board to assist in that area?

I’ve read a few tidbits recently about Collins and Kennedy. All rumours of course, but the general flavour is regarding their role at the club.

I don’t personally have any insight on how effective a role they perform at the Celtic these days. Should there be any issues then I think we’ll find out about it eventually.

Changing your coaching staff isn’t an unusual development. However the rumour that this may be on the cards at Celtic is likely to be just that – a rumour.

Some fans would prefer to see the entire coaching team sacked. I doubt we’ll see anyone from the current coaching team move before the end of the season.

Once the current campaign is dealt with we’ll have a better idea what lies ahead. Right now Celtic need to push hard for this domestic double.

That will require beating Ross County at Celtic Park this Saturday. I talked about motivation in this team – well this is one of those occasions when motivation comes from within.

The League Cup defeat to the Highland club was a bitter blow. County got the rub of the green in that match by playing against 10 man Celtic for the majority of the game and turning that into a victory.

Despite Celtic feeling hard done by, they will be looking for revenge against Ross County. Had Efe Ambrose stayed on the park at Hampden, we may have been looking at a more positive Celtic but instead the heads have been down since then.

The heads have been  down these last 7 days. A long 7 days I might add that were preceded by some excellent form in 2016.

To get out of this lull, beating Ross County would be the perfect tonic. That defeat at Hampden has much to answer for.

I have no doubt that with 11 players on the park, Celtic were going to wipe the floor with County that day. As it was they went a man down and lost the match, the treble and their confidence.

Aberdeen took full advantage of that three days later. With no disrespect to East Kilbride, it could have been another shaky game on Sunday had Celtic come up against a better opponent.

In fariness to EK they did a good job whilst Celtic paced themselves through the game with little effort. The goals came from Leigh Griffiths and Colin Kazim-Richards who started his first game for the club at the Excelsior Stadium.

Logan Bailly also got a rare start, but he was barely tested the entire match. This was a game which was all about the getting through to the next round after a tough week, even though many predicted a torrent of goals against the Lowland League club.

So it is perhaps fitting that Celtic get the chance to change inflict some damage upon the team that began their misery just over a week ago. Ross County will be pleased at their own League Cup progress but Celtic should have all the motivation they require to put one over them on when they visit Glasgow this weekend.

Hail! Hail!

Stevie Mac

Time to move on

As a Celtic fan you have first hand knowledge of how it feels to support the club. So what sort of experience do you have when you’re a player at this moment at Celtic Football Club?

In previous blogs I’ve stated that the manager has criticised the players in the face of defeat(s). The players have backed that claim by stating they hadn’t performed well enough.

What’s going through my mind though is are all the players of the same opinion? I know the first season for Ronny Deila saw a few players dropped for varying reasons but now we’re in season two and I’d be interested to know what the real mood is currently.

The one thing I can say without a shadow of a doubt is that with the exception of Kris Commons’ dugout explosion in Norway, there is a sense of uniformity when talking to the media. As a squad, players have put their hands up to errors, missed opportunities and poor performances.

Not that I would expect a player revolt but I don’t get the sense that the players are unhappy with the coaching. In fact many players have spoken positively about Ronny Deila and the impact he has had on their careers.

Unless the Celtic PR machine are putting on a front, I’d say that European results aside, it’s a happy camp. Now that either means that our squad are so average they can’t see the bigger picture or they believe in the current set-up and we can’t see the bigger picture.

Ronny continues to speak positively and remains unshaken in his belief that he will lead Celtic to greener pastures. In basic terms of course that means the Champions League.

With two failed opportunities under his belt now, Ronny can at the very least look at both campaigns and compare and review. He also has two Europa League campaigns to analyse as well but that all depends on whether he’s prepared to look at his mistakes or just pursue each game with the same plan regardless.

You see for Ronny his philosophy is about playing the game in a certain way. All of the time.

In Scotland you might get away with that because you’re Celtic and generally untouchable. In Europe though, Celtic are much further down the food chain.

As supporters we know that, but we want to be in the respected hierarchy of the game. To do that sometimes you have to make sacrifices.

When you compare Martin O’Neill’s style to Gordon Strachan’s it is easy to spot the difference. Martin wanted Celtic to play the Celtic way (and he had some excellent talent) whilst Gordon would play the way which was most likely to get a result with less individual talent.

We all know which style of football we preferred out of the two. We also know who did better in the Champions League – and no I haven’t forgotten about Seville!

My point here is tactics, adaptation, personnel, resources, motivation and the big one – experience. Not just experience in the squad but on the coaching team.

Ronny has had a run in management for seven years so he isn’t new to the role but his assistants are. What he did with Strømsgodset didn’t happen overnight, it took time.

He imposed his philosophy over a period where it finally paid off after a few years. That was with a club who hadn’t lifted a title in over 40 years.

I’m not suggesting that we wait forever. However, what if that change of gear comes next season?

Many including myself have already debated whether Ronny should get another bite at the cherry. Or even if the board fancy taking another risk.

For the most part my personal view has been to review things at the end of the season. At the same time, I’ve sought assurances over what will change to improve our chances of getting into the Champions League from what we’ve seen these last two summers.

The financial situation is not going to change between now and then. Two seasons without Champions League cash has made certain of that.

Are we waiting on Ronny Deila suddenly changing direction with his philosophy? Well no because he is being given the opportunity to do at Celtic what he did with Strømsgodset because Celtic have few better options.

That is why I think he will be given longer. It’s not so much about the individual purchases.

For me it is about nurturing an entire set-up. Currently this grooming isn’t winning over fans or getting good European results.

All I can say is that if Ronny is here next season it isn’t just about improving from this season. Its about failing to improve in Europe from his first year in charge.

Yes, we’re not even halfway through the current season. We’ve dropped out of Europe earlier than the last season though and that’s a step back.

With the treble still available it has to be a priority to take all domestic honours. There will never be a better time to get it and let’s face it, this could be the turning point for Ronny Deila’s Celtic career and the kick-start required to see him into next season.

Yesterday, Hearts drew with Motherwell and Aberdeen beat Ross County. Celtic have a chance to widen the gap to 7 points with a victory over Inverness Caledonian Thistle at the Caledonian Stadium.

John Hughes’ side aren’t in the same vein of form as they were last season. That doesn’t make a 12.15pm kick-off in Inverness any more pleasing though, particularly in light of Celtic’s Euro exit.

Now it’s time to forget about Europe and concentrate fully on the league and cups. Time to move on.

Hail! Hail!

Stevie Mac

In the moments after publishing this article, I discovered that Anthony Stokes vented his dissatisfaction on Twitter at being dragged up to Inverness only to discover he’ll be sitting in the stands. Being the most excluded senior player in the entire squad, I guess I can write him up as one player in opposition to Ronny Deila.

Black Friday

One minute you’re lifted up and within moments you are dropped to the ground again. Celtic’s failure in Europe is a mental and physical drain on my energy levels.

In fact, I don’t even think I can discuss the mistakes, errors or bad luck today. Generally, its the same story as before – squandered chances, lack of concentration…etc…etc.

Each time I’ve watched Celtic in Europe this season my disappointment has stooped further. No improvement from last season and no sign of better things in the future either.

With those two facts stamped on Celtic’s passports what can we expect to change before next season? Coaching staff, players and boardroom have all been individually blamed for our current woes but what’s the next move?

Option 1. Sack Ronny Deila.

This is the obvious solution for many but it does seem unlikely right now. Peter Lawwell backed him at the AGM last week as you’d expect.

Europe alone has been poor. Worse than last season in fact.

Unable to maintain a lead, keep a clean sheet, concentrate for the whole match or find another gear to step things up. Things have gone backwards not forwards.

Ronny maintains his stance that things will improve. It’s rather bold considering the obvious factors in all of Celtic’s European results – tactical naivety, inability to adapt within the match, struggle in the face of adversity.

With a domestic treble still on the table I believe he will be allowed the opportunity to make that happen but it remains to be seen if he can. What I don’t know is if Celtic really are behind him for another European campaign or if they are just keeping the peace for now.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, Neil Lennon was given a third shot at Europe. It turned out to be his best and this was where he peaked as the season that followed, Lennon’s fourth, was his last.

Unfortunately for Ronny, he has had two golden opportunities to get into the Champions League. The teams that stood in his way were average and totally beatable but those opponents carved Celtic up.

Ronny has a philosophy and I get that but sometimes you need to adapt rather than persist, particularly when your philosophy is not showing signs of working. If he totally believes that next season we’ll be in the Champions League, I would like to know how that is going to be achieved and what changes will be made because you can’t just convince people based on your say so.

I more than anyone else would love to see Ronny Deila succeed and at the same time would love to be wrong but I’m finding myself believing that he has his limitations. A coach with a philosophy seems to be why he was hired in the first place but to manage and take the team forward is a skill he may not possess.

Option 2. Spend Better.

The board have been criticised over the years about not spending when required. I’ve agreed and disagreed with some of these debates because lets face it football supporters just want to see good signings without any really idea about finances.

In recent years though, Celtic have been buying some real donkeys. I won’t go through any of these but a lot of money has been wasted.

Peter Lawwell stated at the AGM that the market they can afford to shop in is a hit or miss one. I argued that one superb player for more money would be better than cheaper gambles.

A friend pointed out that with a more expensive signing comes a higher salary. It’s a fair point and Celtic are unlikely to sustain high salaries, in fact it is the reason for moving on some of our rising stars I’m sure.

Having said that, Celtic do need to be more bold in transfer market. They also need to do better on the scouting front because it simply isn’t good enough.

As Chris Sutton said last night on BT Sport, whoever is buying the players needs to be doing a better job. If Celtic want to punch a hole in the Champions League again they’re going to need some influential players who can change the game at the highest level.

I’ve not had much time for Sutton’s comments in the past but I can’t argue with his passionate venting on TV last night. The difference with what he is saying now is more about timing than anything else and it is time for action at the club.

The club have regressed so far, we are a shadow of our former selves. The business may look great but the football is not.

Option 3. Stick With The Plan.

Even although we haven’t improved since last season the only other thing Celtic as a club can do is stick with the same formula. Coaching staff, players, philosophy, transfer policy……the whole shebang.

This seems the most likely thing to happen. If Deila was to go, of his own accord or getting pushed, I don’t know who’d replace him.

In terms of money we outspend any other club in Scotland already. That just gets Celtic into Europe and keeps a buffer between them and the rest of the SPFL.

If there is to be no shift in with the club in its current set up, then they will have to pray that this bears fruit next season. The tough part will be keeping the supporters on board because right now people are losing faith if they haven’t already.

Last night I discussed with some mates about which names would go into the hat if Ronny left. The usual suspects came up but in all honesty I can only see Celtic going lower down the market.

You can forget guys like David Moyes or the recently appointed at Blackburn Rovers, Paul Lambert. This job comes with financial limitations so candidate options are even more limited than the player market we are currently in.

Personally, I don’t think there is a coach in Scotland that could do a job at Celtic. Paul Hartley has been on the rumour mill before but that’s more by default than any ability he has if you ask me.

Another foreign coach would be the only way forward. Failing that, you are looking at a coach from the lower leagues in England which to be honest is not my cup of tea.

The names that cropped up last night though, aside from Paul Hartley were, Roy Keane, Neil Lennon and Jackie McNamara. The financial limitations were said to be the reason behind Keane turning down Celtic and also the reason for Lennon leaving so whether either would be interested in returning to the club is up for debate.

Jackie McNamara left Dundee United with a whimper after being relieved of his best players. You could argue that the club didn’t help replace those players but of the three that Celtic acquired, we’ve yet to see them do a convincing job under Ronny Deila.

The one name that didn’t come up in that brief conversation was John Collins. When he was hired I imagined he would be the back up guy should Deila fail.

In all honesty I don’t know if he would be deemed as culpable as Ronny. On the bench during games most of the activity is between Deila and John Kennedy.

Would Celtic offer Collins the head role if Ronny left or would he go with him? It would be interesting to see how that one would play out.

Whichever way you look at it, the market is narrow and when you consider that, it is understandable why Celtic opted for Ronny in the first place. He may not have been first choice but he was the best on the table I’m guessing.

Hail! Hail!

Stevie Mac